TicketDesk 2.5 – Coming soon!

TicketDesk-2.5While I’ve been working on TicketDesk 3, the code for TicketDesk 2 hasn’t been getting any younger. Since TD3 is still a ways out from a production release, I’ve decided to release a major overhaul of TicketDesk 2 in the meantime. The new TicketDesk 2.5 release will bring the technology stack of TD2 up to the latest version of Microsoft’s Web Platform. Several of the changes will be derived from code developed for TD3.

I am targeting the end of October for a beta version, with a final release in mid to late November (subject to change, as always).

Here are the major changes I have planned so far:

Remove AD Security:

This release will not support direct integration with Active Directory. This was a popular feature in TicketDesk 1 and 2, but it has also been a major problem area as well. Instead, TD 2.5 will only support AD indirectly, via federation (ADFS for example) or through integration with an external identity server (like Azure AD).

Modernized Local Security:

TicketDesk 2.1x still uses the ancient SqlMembership providers that shipped with .Net 2.0 back in 2005. Authorization and identity have come a very long way since then, so TD 2.5 will be upgraded to the newest Aspnet.Identity framework version. It will also provide on-screen management tools to help administrators migrate existing user accounts from their legacy TD 2.1x databases.

UI Changes:

TD2.1x was built on Asp.net MVC 2, with the original Asp.net view engine. This isn’t very well supported by recent versions of Visual Studio, and most developers have long since abandoned the old engine in favor of Razor. I don’t plan many major changes to the general UI’s behavior or appearance, but by re-implementing on Razor I can bring the project into compatibility with Visual Studio 2013 and current Asp.net coding standards.

There will be some minor changes to the UI. I will be removing some of the crusty old JQuery components, and updating the styles to take advantage of newer CSS features that weren’t widely supported when TD2 was first built.

Entity Framework Code-First:

TicketDesk 2.5 will move from Entity Framework 4 database-first models to Entity Framework 6 with a Code-First model. EF Migrations will provide ongoing schema management from here out, including the ability to migrate legacy TicketDesk 2.1x databases. Along with this change, TD 2.5 will also include on-screen database management utilities for migrating legacy databases, seeding demo/test data, and so on.

This refactoring will also bring TD 2.5 in line with the technologies backing TD 3, which will greatly simplify future upgrades.

Eliminate MEF:

The managed extensibility framework has continued to evolve, but it still isn’t a very good choice for Dependency Injection concerns in a web application. Instead, TD 2.5 will use Simple Injector for IoC. Some of the simplifications in the back-end should also reduce the reliance on dependency injection techniques quite a lot.

Improved Email Notifications:

Several improvements to Email Notifications are planned. Most of these are intended to give administrators greater control over how and when TicketDesk sends email notifications. This will include better on-screen testing and diagnostic tools for troubleshooting email related issues.

Multiple Projects:

TicketDesk 2.5 will support multiple projects, which let you handle tickets for different operations, projects, or products in isolation. You will be able to move tickets from one project to another, and can turn off multiple project support  entirely if you don’t need the functionality. I do not know yet if I’ll support user permissions on a per-project basis in this version, but TD3 will certainly provide that functionality.

Watch/Follow Tickets:

Users will be able to watch or follow tickets without having to be the ticket’s owner or assigned user. This will allow these users to receive notifications of changes as the ticket progresses.

Azure Deployments:

TicketDesk 2.5 will be deployable as an Azure WebSite. Currently, there are several issues that make deploying to cloud or farm environments tricky. The biggest are that the Lucene search indexes are stored on the file system, and the old SqlMembership providers are not compatible with the features provided by Azure SQL. These issues are not insurmountable for experienced .Net developers, but deployment to web farms or cloud providers is not currently an out-of-box capability of the system.

To make TicketDesk play well with cloud environments, a pluggable storage provider will be used for any features needing access to non-database storage. When deployed to single instance environments, TD 2.5 will use the file system, but you will be able to reconfigure it for Azure Blob storage when deploying to the cloud. Attachment storage will be moved out of the SQL database to the new storage provider as well.

The only hold-up for Azure SQL is the membership system, but the newer Aspnet.Identity framework fully supports EF migrations and is compatible with any EF data provider –including Azure SQL.

Early pre-alpha code is already committed to the CodePlex repository, and will be updated regularly as work continues. Right now, there isn’t much to see. I’m still working on the basic plumbing for database and identity management, so there are no TD specific user facing features yet. As soon as the back-end is shored up, I’ll start porting in TD specific UI features.

A demo version of the site will be available soon, hosted on Azure. I just have to workout a few minor details related to resetting the database and providing sample seed data, then I can open the demo to the public.

2 Replies to “TicketDesk 2.5 – Coming soon!”

  1. Hi,
    great work and tnx for sharing.
    Working on 2.5 beta but I don’t have an administrative account to log in and configure the system (eg. mail server, etc.etc.)
    Regards.

    Red.

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